Budapest’s bike traffic video-visualized. Part of the SubMap project using UrbanCyclr.

via Explore

llysakowski:

Eric Fischer’s beautiful data visualization map of the Bay Area. Eric is plotting Flickr photos on a map and highlighting 50 major cities in a vector view. The different colors represent different modes of transportation: Black is walking (less than 7mph), Red is bicycling or equivalent speed (less than 19mph), Blue is motor vehicles on normal roads (less than 43mph); Green is freeways or rapid transit. 
Photos by Eric Fischer
Via: Larissa Zimberoff


The new landscape. Beautiful visualization of the Bay area.

llysakowski:

Eric Fischer’s beautiful data visualization map of the Bay AreaEric is plotting Flickr photos on a map and highlighting 50 major cities in a vector view. The different colors represent different modes of transportation: Black is walking (less than 7mph), Red is bicycling or equivalent speed (less than 19mph), Blue is motor vehicles on normal roads (less than 43mph); Green is freeways or rapid transit. 

Photos by Eric Fischer

Via: Larissa Zimberoff

The new landscape. Beautiful visualization of the Bay area.

(Source: blog.flickr.net, via humanscalecities)

minusmanhattan:

Map of New York City generated using location data from Twitter.

minusmanhattan:

Map of New York City generated using location data from Twitter.

(via seaintheseitz)

77.6 billion people born, 969 million people killed. Data visualization that represents a timeline between 3200 BCE to 2009 CE and over 1100 conflicts of recorded human history.

Everyone Ever in the World by The Luxury of Protest

Jack Kerouac’s On the Road as data visualizations created by Stefanie Posavec. Part One is divided into chapters, chapters divided into paragraphs, paragraphs divided into sentences, and sentences divided into words. Everything is colour-coded according to key themes in the book.

I’ve been getting really obsessed with data visualization lately. I’m a geek-at-heart, but totally terrified by math. What I like about data viz is how is uses UI design to  remove some of the accessibility issues I have when working with data.

The thecolorof.com is one of the more poetic examples of how we can use data and algorithms to visually understand the complexities of the world around us. In the words of Bret Victor “The power to understand and predict the quantities of the world should not be restricted to those with a freakish knack for manipulating abstract symbols.”